Holland Massachusetts, 1890

Holland is a small farming town lying in the southeastern extremity of Hampden County, about 70 miles southwest of Boston. Its nearest railroad stations are on a branch of the Norwich and Worcester Railroad, at Southbridge centre, about six and a half miles east, and at Palmer, some nine miles northwest, the junction of the Boston and Albany Railroad and roads running northward.

Brimfield lies on the north, Sturbridge on the east, Wales on the west, and Union, in Connecticut, on the south. The assessed area is 7,120 acres; and of this 2,286 acres are forest, consisting mostly of chestnut. The land is hilly, with a strong soil, generally a sandy loam. The 56 farms in 1888 yielded products reaching, in the aggregate, the value of $34,867.

Sioug Pond, or Holland Reservoir, in the northern part of the town, contains about 600 acres. The Quinebaug River runs northerly through the eastern part, receiving as affluents May, Stevens and Lombard brooks. On all of these there have been saw mills or grist mills, some of which are still operated.

The aggregate value of goods made in the last census year was $1,050 [sic]. The dwelling-houses number 64. The valuation in 1888 was $107,160, with a tax-rate of $11 on $1,000. The population was 229. There are a town-hall, four public school-houses, one Sunday-school library containing about 75 volumes, and a Congregational church.

This place was formerly East Brimfield, a part of South Brimfield; established as the district of Holland July 5, 1783; incorporated as the town of Holland May 1, 1836. Its territory was settled as early as 1720.

pp. 378-379 in Nason and Varney's Massachusetts Gazetteer, 1890

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