lost and wrecked


picture

picture Captain Philip Dumaresq



      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 30 Apr 1804 - Swan Island (Dresden), Maine
        Baptism: 
          Death: 25 Jun 1861 - lost overboard, steamer Empire State
         Burial: 11 Jul 1861 - Forest Hills Cemetery, Boston 1
 Cause of Death: 

Events
• Alt Birth


Parents
         Father: James Dumaresq (1772-1826)
         Mother: Sarah Farwell (1778-1870)

Spouses and Children
1. *Margaretta Deblois (1806 - 4 Sep 1855)
       Marriage: 9 Jun 1836 - Boston, Massachusetts

Notes
General:
"Captain Philip Dumaresq
Captain Philip Dumaresq of Boston was always known by his host of friends as "The Prince of Sea-Captains," and was so popular while in port that no other vessel could be loaded or unloaded until his ship had been taken care of. He was one of the best-known American captains in the China trade, and all shipping firms were eager to get him to sail their vessels.
Born at Swan Island on the Kennebec River in the year 1804, he was the only son of James S. Dumaresq, his mother being the beautiful Miss Rebecca Gardiner of Gardiner, Me. [his grandmother, actually] Captain Dumaresq tells the story of his childhood days, when at the age of six he decided he wanted to learn to swim. He asked a native boy who was only twelve years old to teach him, as his parents had forbidden him to go neat the river until he could swim. As a bribe for the lessons, he gave his friend his most valuable possession, a picture-book of ships, from which he parted with great sorrow. He quickly achieved his object, but when he told his parents what he had done, he was much surprised at being severely punished for his disobedience.
Swan Island lacked facilities for education, therefore at the age of twelve his father sent him to his kinsman, Robert Hallowell Gardiner, of Gardiner, Me., which was sixteen miles up the river. At the age of fifteen he entered a shipbuilding yard where he readily mastered the important details and built a few toy boats. Unlike most American boys, however, who used to go to sea in their youth, Dumaresq had no special longing for a life on the ocean, but his physician advised him on account of his delicate health to choose the sea as his calling, and, as usually happened in many such cases, he very soon became robust. At the early age of sixteen he went before the mast, and made such rapid progress that he commanded a vessel when he was about twenty-two years of age.
Dumaresq began his career by keeping the log of the "Samuel Russell," so-called after the founder of the house of Russell & Co. It was his duty to keep the log, and his entries for the voyage were most amusing, as he always added many exclamation-marks whenever he had to make references to reefing or taking-in sail, his commander evidently being too careful to please him. One day he entered in the log: "Under single and double-reefed topsails," and then followed sixteen exclamation-marks showing his disgust at such action. Again later on appeared, "Let out reefs and made sail; consequently made a good run !!!! A few days later the log read, "Fresh breezes, thick weather, double-reefed topsails !!!" The records of the ships Captain Dumaresq later commanded show that he wasn't prone to take in any unnecessary reefs.
His worst experience was being chased for three days by pirates. Upon noticing them he at once got ready all his guns, the "Quaker" ones as well as the real ones, and then ordered below all of his men but two so that his pursuers could not form any idea of the size of the crew, thereby hoping to frighten them through ignorance of the defence he would be able to put up. On this voyage he had one passenger, Mrs. Joseph Coolidge, mother of the present Thomas Jefferson Coolidge of Boston, to whom he told the danger they were in. She retired to the cabin, where she remained two days without any lights. At the end of the second day it seemed hopeless to hold out any longer, and so Captain Dumaresq explained to her the very grave danger and asked her to decide whether they should all be taken or whether he should blow up the ship. She decided upon the latter course and the whole crew calmly awaited the result of the race for life. For a few hours more the pirates followed very closely, but finally decided to abandon the chase. Dumaresq could not say enough in praise of Mrs. Coolidge's bravery.
He first commanded the "Antelope" on her first voyage to China. The ship was built for Captain R. B. Forbes by Samuel Hall in East Boston. He also commanded the "Akbar" owned by J. M. Forbes & Co., the "Bald Eagle" and the "Romance of the Seas," both owned by George B. Upton, and the very successful "Surprise." He had practically retired from the sea when his wife and daughter died most unexpectedly. A number of his friends then decided they would build the "Florence," and would get him to superintend her while she was being built in order to take his mind off the tragedy that had just befallen him. Captain Dumaresq took the "Florence" to sea, having also a financial interest in her. His vessels were to him almost like members of his family, and he looked upon them with the greatest pride; in his last voyage in the "Florence" he described her while anchored opposite his window in the office of Russell & Co. in Hong Kong, writing that "she has been all painted and to my mind is the best-looking vessel in port, and I also suspect I am not the only one who thinks so." His last voyage was made in the "Florence" when he took her to Japan in 1856, she being the first American vessel that had ever entered the port of Nagasaki.
During the long winters the Dumaresqs took many sleigh-rides up and down the Kennebec Valley, and some of their friends and neighbors upon whom they often called were Mr. Farwell of Vassalboro, Dr. James Tupper of Richmond, near Swan Island, Judge Bowman, and Robert Hallowell at Hallowell, General Dearborn at Gardiner, and Hon. Benjamin Vaughan, who owned a fine estate at Hallowell overlooking the Kennebec River, which is still in the family. "
Source: Other Merchants and Sea Captains of Old Boston, State Street Trust Company, Boston, Mass., 1919

Capt. Dumaresq was lost overboard after leaving Boston on the steamer Empire State. July 9th,1861 Boston Daily Advertiser
---------------------------------------------
James Dumaresq and James Warner Seaver were briefly beaus of cousins Harriett Low and Caroline Shillaber in 1832 at Macao.
Everything in Style: Harriet Low's Macau, Rosmarie W. N. Lamas. 2006. Hong Kong University Press, p. 141.
-------------------------------------------------
Bald Eagle

An extreme clipper ship built in 1852 by Donald McKay, East Boston, MA. Dimensions: 215'×41'6"×22'6" and tonnage 1705 tons, old measurements. She had no head or trailboards.
1852 November 25
Launched at the shipyard of Donald McKay, East Boston, for George B. Upton of Boston. Put on the California trade under Captain Philip Dumaresq.

1852 December 26
Sailed from New York to San Francisco in 107 days.

1853 May 8 - August 13
Sailed from San Francisco to New York in 96 days. Captain Caldwell replaced Capt. Dumaresq who was given command of the new clipper Romance of the Sea.
---------------------------------------------------------
Romance of the Sea
Extreme clipper ship built in 1853 by Donald McKay, East Boston. Rigged with Capt. Forbes' double topsail rig. Her dimensions were 140'x39'6"x29'6" and tonnage 1782 tons

1853 November 15
Launched at Donald McKay's Yard at East Boston, for George B. Upton of Boston. Employed in the California Trade.

1853 December 16
Sailed for San Francisco under command of Capt. Dumaresq after having loaded at the Long Wharf, Boston, for Messers. Timothy Davis & Co.'s line of San Francisco Clippers.

1863
Disappeared en route to San Francisco after having left Hong Kong 31st of December 1862.
References:

Octavius T. Howe & Frederick C. Matthews: American Clipper Ships 1833-1858. 1926.
Richard McKay: Some Famous Sailing Ships and Their Builder Donald McKay. 1928.
--------------------------------------------------------
Donald McLean: The New Clipper ship, Romance of the Sea, of Boston.
Boston Daily Atlas, 8 Nov 1853.
We have already said that she is expected to beat the Flying Cloud, still the "king of clippers", and this expectation is based upon her great length, the sharpness of her ends, her moderate depth, buoyancy and length of floor, and the care that has been bestowed in balancing her spars. If appearance are any indication of speed, every one who has any knowledge of clippers, we think, will agree with us, that she must "like the wind". To our eye she is a perfect beauty; indeed, the most beautiful vessel of any class that we have ever seen.

She was built at East Boston by Mr Donald McKay, the builder of the Great Republic, and is owned by George B. Upton, Esq., of this city. Capt. Dumaresq commands her, and it is not too much to say, that as an accomplished, daring and successful shipmaster, he has few equals.

The Romance of the Sea is now lying at the south side of Long wharf, and is loading with despatch in Messers. Timothy Davis & Co's line of San Francisco clippers. We advise every one, who admires the beautiful in naval architecture, to call and see her.
2
Marriage Notes (Margaretta Deblois)
"A rather amusing incident happened in connection with [Capt. Dumaresq's] wedding at Trinity Church, Boston, to Miss Margaretta DeBlois. Captain R. B. Forbes was to be best man and had arranged for them to pass their honeymoon on board ship on a voyage to China. The bride and bridegroom were to go direct from the church to the vessel in Boston Harbour. When the time came for the ceremony, however, Captain Forbes, hearing that there was trouble on board ship, was obliged to hurry down to the wharf and so was unable to act as best man for his friend. He straightened out the difficulty, however, and got everything shipshape before the bridal pair arrived."
--------------------------------------
1855 Mass. census, Roxbury 2

picture Austin R Dunham

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 24 Aug 1857 - Provincetown, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: 16 Jun 1883 - Lost At Sea
         Burial: in Provincetown, Massachusetts
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: John T Dunham (1815-1882) 4
         Mother: Abbie Snow (1825-1891) 4


picture
Edwin W Dunham

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: Sep 1852 - Provincetown, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: 29 Jan 1867 - lost at sea from schr Estella 5
         Burial: in Provincetown, Massachusetts 4
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: John T Dunham (1815-1882) 4
         Mother: Abbie Snow (1825-1891) 4


picture
George L Dunham

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 1877
        Baptism: 
          Death: 1919 - Lost At Sea
         Burial: in Provincetown, Massachusetts
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Captain John A Dunham (1847-1912) 4
         Mother: Margaret A McKenzie (1856-1945) 4


picture
John P Dunphy

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: Cir 1944 - Eastham, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: 9 Oct 1967 - lost at sea, S.S. Pan Oceanic Faith
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Notes
General:
"Six MMA graduates were among those who died in the frigid water: John P. Dunphy of Eastham, Class of 1965; John M. Ward of Canton, Class of 1965; John R. McPhee of Orleans, Class of 1967; Joseph P. Nowd of Brighton, Class of 1967; Robert E. Janes of Danvers, Class of 1967; and James Bechtold of Weymouth, Class of 1967. Orleans resident Earl Richardson - a father of five - also died in the disaster."

full article: Cape Cod Times, 10 Oct 2010
'Time to remember them again'
By K.C. MYERS
"ORLEANS - Who knows what made Bill Doherty turn his head and see the name of his deceased classmate at the side of a quiet road in Orleans this summer.

"I was going to a yard sale and drove by this little sign," said Doherty, 64, of Centerville.

The name John R. McPhee stared back at him. Not many people alive today would understand the full meaning of the overgrown memorial.

But Doherty happened to have graduated from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy with John "Jack" McPhee in March 1967. The small class of about 40 cadets had been the first class since World War II to graduate early because they were needed in the U.S. Merchant Marine service to help transfer supplies for the war effort in Vietnam, he said.

Many in the class eventually entered the military, Doherty said. But McPhee, along with three other classmates, and two upperclassmen from the Class of 1965, never got that chance.

Six months after leaving school, McPhee and the others were Merchant Marine seamen aboard the SS Panoceanic Faith, an old World War II C-2 freighter.

The 459-foot freighter had been loaded with fertilizer and was heading from San Francisco to India on a U.S. aid mission when it encountered heavy weather in the North Pacific, according to accounts from The Boston Globe archives. The winds reported off Alaska that day were about 45 knots, and seas were around 25 feet, according to the accounts.

After an SOS went out, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Navy and private vessels swarmed the area searching for survivors. Thirty-six seamen were lost and five survived, Doherty said.

Six MMA graduates were among those who died in the frigid water: John P. Dunphy of Eastham, Class of 1965; John M. Ward of Canton, Class of 1965; John R. McPhee of Orleans, Class of 1967; Joseph P. Nowd of Brighton, Class of 1967; Robert E. Janes of Danvers, Class of 1967; and James Bechtold of Weymouth, Class of 1967. Orleans resident Earl Richardson - a father of five - also died in the disaster.

The deaths of the men cast a pall over Doherty and his fellow maritime academy graduates.

"It changed everyone's attitude," Doherty said. "We were proud to graduate early but we didn't know what we didn't know. ... That ship smartened us up fast."

The classmates had been close friends. They met often at the Land Ho! Bar and Restaurant in Orleans, Doherty said.

To see McPhee's name 43 years later on a roadside memorial brought back a lot of emotions, Doherty said. "We've all moved on with our lives, but it seemed that it was time to remember them again," he said.

So Doherty and fellow MMA graduates Paul Cass and Bob McMurray met one day to plant marigolds and spruce up the little garden around the Orleans memorial.

The wooden sign had cracked, so Doherty had a new sign made, this one listing all the names of the deceased and explaining a little about the SS Panoceanic Faith disaster.

But the trio didn't stop there. Cass, who lives in Orleans, and Doherty and McMurray, both of Cotuit, began contacting family members of the lost seamen.

They decided to honor the seven men yesterday with a service at the new memorial at the corner of Walker and Cedar Cove roads in Orleans.

About 80 people attended the service, including Earl Richardson's cousin, the Rev. Robert Richardson of Wareham, who gave the final blessing, and Jack McPhee's sister, Mary Lou Wilcox, who traveled from Pennsylvania, Doherty said.

"I don't think anyone left the ceremony feeling bad," Doherty said."

Copyright © Cape Cod Media Group, a division of Ottaway Newspapers, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

picture Atkins Dyer

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 23 Jun 1808 - Provincetown, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: 1 Nov 1842 - Lost At Sea
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Benjamin Dyer (1780-1826) 7
         Mother: Salome Cook (1785-1867)

Spouses and Children
1. *Ruth Goodspeed (1812 - 28 May 1893)
       Marriage: 


picture
Benjamin Dyer

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 1 Dec 1733 - Truro, Massachusetts 9
        Baptism: 9 Dec 1733 - Truro, Massachusetts 10
          Death: Jun 1795 - At Sea
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: William Dyer (1690-After 1764) 11
         Mother: Hannah Strout (1690-1735)

Spouses and Children
1. *Hannah Morton Higgins (20 Apr 1763 -       )
       Marriage: Nov 1783 - Maine


picture
Captain Benjamin Dyer

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 16 Apr 1828 - Truro, Massachusetts 12
        Baptism: 
          Death: 13 Aug 1868 - Bay of Arica, Peru
         Burial: in Snow cemetery, Truro
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Captain Benjamin Dyer (1793-1871)
         Mother: Dinah Hinckley Davis (1797-1875) 13

Spouses and Children
1. *Sarah C Wilson (1838 - 13 Aug 1868)
       Marriage: 

Notes
Marriage Notes (Sarah C Wilson)
Captain and Mrs Dyer died in the wreck of the ship "Fredonia" by an earthquake at the bay of Arica, Peru. Their children were on shore at the time and were unharmed.
--------------------------------------------
ARICA

Presently located within Chile, the city of Arica has the sort of multi national past common to many cities located near the border between two nations with a less than friendly relationship, historically. The land along the extreme northern coast of Chile, including Arica, was a part of Peru from the country's inception until the later part of the nineteenth century, when the War of the Pacific broke out. During the war, Peru and Chile fought an off and on series of battles from 1879 to 1929. When the war finally ended in defeat for Peru, the country was forced by treaty to ceed Arica, and the surrounding lands to Chile. For our purposes however, at the time of the 1868 tsunami Arica still belonged to Peru.

THE TSUNAMI

On August 13, 1868, a magnitude 8.5 earthquake struck the area of the Peru-Chile Trench located just off of Peru's extreme southern coast. The large earthquake that reduced the port of Arica to rubble, also generated a huge trans-pacific tsunami that struck Arica shortly after the earthquake ended. Three navy ships were anchored in the port at the time of the earthquake; two American, the warship US Wateree and storeship Fredonia; and one Peruvian, the warship Americana. Accounts from crew members of the two American ships who survived the tsunami give the following details. Several minutes after the quake the first tsunami wave arrived at Arica as a rapid rise of water, followed by a fierce withdrawal. The second wave estimated at 90 feet, was the largest. Its advance dashed the hapless Fredonia to pieces on the rocks of a harbor island, killing all but two crew members. The second wave snapped the moorings of both the Americana and the Wateree, and carried the two ships far inland, where they eventually ran aground. When the ocean finally returned to normal the Watree was, amazingly, still in near-perfect condition.... sitting on the beach 430 yards from the water!

Despite the height and ferocity of the tsunami, the Wateree reported only one casualty. The Americana however, was not as lucky, loosing 83 men including the captain. The tsunami was disastrous for the port of Arica as well, where an estimated 25,000 people died as a result of the earthquake and tsunami. The waves literally swept the low-lying parts of the town clean, removing all traces, including the foundations, of the structures that once existed there.

In total, the 1868 tsunami caused an estimated 300 million dollars in damage, and killed as many as 70,000 people along the South American coast.
http://www.usc.edu/dept/tsunamis/peru/ptsu_1868.html [with several major errors of names and dates corrected]
also see http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/powhatan.htm
---------------------------------
Children
Florence Azubah Dyer b: 22 DEC 1859 in Truro, Barnstable, Ma
Arthur Wilson Dyer b: 24 AUG 1861 in Truro, Barnstable, Ma
Mary Dyer b: ABT 1860 in Truro, Barnstable, Ma

There is a joint gravestone for Catherine Dyer, Benjamin Dyer and his unnamed wife:
"Catherine Dyer
died Feb. 6, 1870 Æt 33 yrs
Benjamin Dyer Jr
an officer in the U.S.N. aged 40 yrs. His wife. aged 30 yrs perished in the wreck of the ship Fredonia by earthquqake in the bay of Arica S.A. Aug. 13. 1868" 14

picture Benjamin H Dyer

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: Dec 1836 - Wellfleet, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: 24 Aug 1873 - lost at sea, from sch Lizzie D. Barker
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Sylvanus Collins Dyer (1786-1870)
         Mother: Betsey M Hopkins (1793-1863)

Spouses and Children
1. *Angeline Young (20 May 1840 - 31 Aug 1896) 15 
       Marriage: 29 May 1861 - Wellfleet, Massachusetts

Notes
General:
1862 seaman, Wellfleet
Marriage Notes (Angeline Young)
1870 Census, Wellfleet, Barnstable, Ma:
Dyer, Benjamin H, 33, Seaman, Mass
Dyer, Angie, 30, Keeping House, Mass
Dyer, Addie F, 8, Attending School, Mass

picture Caleb Dyer

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 16 Jun 1785 - Truro, Massachusetts 16
        Baptism: 14 Jul 1785 - Truro, Massachusetts 17
          Death: 1800 - Norfolk, Virginia
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Paul Dyer (1747-1837)
         Mother: Sarah Small (1753-1838)
picture

Sources


1 Records of Forest Hills Cemetery, Boston, Al Maze, email 5/2008.

2 Other Merchants and Sea Captains of Old Boston (1919. State Street Trust Company, Boston, Mass.)

3 Provincetown cemeteries (http://www.provincetowngov.org/historic/cem.htm). badly organized

4 Provincetown cemeteries (http://www.provincetowngov.org/historic/cem.htm).

5 Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910 (Massachusetts Archives. [online at AmericanAncestors.org (NEHGS) and FamilySearch.org]), 202:11 (Provincetown).

6 George Ernest Bowman and Ethel A. Richardson, "Provincetown, Massachusetts Vital Records" (Mayflower Descendant), 23:143.

7 Frank Dyer, "Descendants of William & Mary (Barrett) Dyer of Rhode Island" (Rootsweb files will_riged, spragueged).

8 Marilyn Maxwell Strout, "Descendants of James Maxwell and Christopher Strout" (2001. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~strout/geneal.html). unreferenced but generally plausible

9 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, Vital Records of Truro, Massachusetts to the year 1849 (1933. Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants. republished online), 5.

10 John Harvey Treat, rearranged by Kathryn Rich, Wellfleet, Truro, & Cape Cod Vital Statistics. Section Two, Truro Baptisms 1711-1800 (1969. Wellfleet MA: Rich Family Association), 17. has transcription errors

11 Marilyn Maxwell Strout, "Descendants of James Maxwell and Christopher Strout" (2001. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~strout/geneal.html).

12 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, Vital Records of Truro, Massachusetts to the year 1849 (1933. Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants. republished online), 256.

13 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, Vital Records of Truro, Massachusetts to the year 1849 (1933. Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants. republished online), 169.

14 Richard A. Haskell, editor, Truro Cemeteries (2000. Wellfleet MA: Rich Family Association).

15 Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910 (Massachusetts Archives. [online at AmericanAncestors.org (NEHGS) and FamilySearch.org]), 463:13 (Eastham).

16 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, Vital Records of Truro, Massachusetts to the year 1849 (1933. Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants. republished online), 164.

17 John Harvey Treat, rearranged by Kathryn Rich, Wellfleet, Truro, & Cape Cod Vital Statistics. Section Two, Truro Baptisms 1711-1800 (1969. Wellfleet MA: Rich Family Association), 20.


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