The Sacred Cod


lost and wrecked


picture

picture Samuel K Kenrick

      Sex: M
AKA: Samuel H Kenrick
Individual Information
          Birth: 10 Nov 1784 - Eastham, Massachusetts 3 4
        Baptism: 
          Death: 6 Mar 1822 - Port Au Prince, Haiti
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Captain Jonathan Kenrick (1761-1839)
         Mother: Betty Rogers (1764-1852) 5

Spouses and Children
1. *Eunisa Eldredge (Est 1790 -       )
       Marriage: 24 Nov 1812


picture
Captain Seth Kenrick

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 16 Jul 1803 - Orleans, Massachusetts 3 4
        Baptism: 
          Death: 12 Dec 1821
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: fever


Parents
         Father: Captain Jonathan Kenrick (1761-1839)
         Mother: Betty Rogers (1764-1852) 5


picture
Seth Kenrick

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 17 Aug 1775 - Eastham, Massachusetts 6 7
        Baptism: 
          Death: 30 Nov 1797 - Santa Cruz
         Burial: in Orleans Cemetery 8
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Jonathan Kenrick (1745-1809) 5
         Mother: Hannah Cole (1749-1837)


picture
Jonathan C Kilburn

      Sex: M
AKA: Jonathan C Kilby
Individual Information
          Birth: Cir 1817 - Provincetown, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: 15 Jan 1865 - Cape Verde Islands
         Burial: in Provincetown, Massachusetts
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Jonathan Crowell Kilburn (1789-1861) 10
         Mother: Priscilla Stafford (Cir 1790-1835) 11

Spouses and Children
1. *Lucy A Boyington (1815 -       )
       Marriage: 19 May 1838 - Wellfleet, Massachusetts 12

Notes
General:

1850 Ptown census, p. 49
dwelling 418, household 476
Jonathan Kilburn, 32, $720, mariner
Hannah, 26
Levi, 21, mariner
Mary L, 5, in school
all b MA

picture Levi Atkins Kilburn

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 10 Oct 1829 - Provincetown, Massachusetts 13
        Baptism: 
          Death: Oct 1858 - Lost At Sea 14
         Burial: in Cemetery #2, Provincetown
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Jonathan Crowell Kilburn (1789-1861) 10
         Mother: Priscilla Stafford (Cir 1790-1835) 11

Spouses and Children
1. *Sylvia Higgins (12 Jun 1833 - 21 Jun 1890)
       Marriage: 20 Feb 1853 - Provincetown, Massachusetts


picture
William G Kilburn

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 1831 - Provincetown, Massachusetts
        Baptism: 
          Death: Oct 1858 - Lost At Sea
         Burial: in Cemetery #2, Provincetown
 Cause of Death: 


Parents
         Father: Jonathan Crowell Kilburn (1789-1861) 10
         Mother: Priscilla Stafford (Cir 1790-1835) 11


picture
Abigail Kimball

      Sex: F

Individual Information
          Birth: 6 21 17775 - Goshen, Orange, New York
        Baptism: 
          Death: 11 Oct 1817 - Savannah, Georgia
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Spouses and Children
1. *Captain Reuben Newcomb (25 Jul 1774 - Abt 1835) 15 17 18 19 
       Marriage: 25 Nov 1812 - Dorcester, Massachusetts 20

Notes
General:
d/o Levi Kimball & Abigail Sissons

m1 Joseph B O'Cain, 14 mar 1799 Boston

picture Captain Billy King



      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 7 Dec 1931 - (Provincetown, Massachusetts)
        Baptism: 
          Death: 24 Oct 1976 - dragger Patricia Marie, near Pollock Rip
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 

Events
• Social Security Number, 018-22-9502, Massachusetts in Massachusetts


Notes
General:
Provincetown Banner story
30-year anniversary of the Patricia Marie disaster
By Pru Sowers
Banner Staff

PROVINCETOWN — It was the mother lode of scallops, appearing just in time to offset the sudden, unexplained disappearance of codfish in the summer of 1976.

A giant, unfathomable bed of scallops, found about 10 miles offshore, near a place called Pollock Rip. No one knew how long the bed would keep producing, but day after day, boatload after boatload, the scallops kept coming up in the bags tossed out by Provincetown fishermen, who had changed the rigging on their boats to dredges, replacing the nets that had been used to troll for cod and flounder. The scallop bed kept going, until 50 or 60 boats a day from New Bedford, Harwich and other ports were steaming to the same few square miles to fill their holds and decks with scallops, which in the fall of 1976 were going for $2.50 a pound shucked, a fortune in those days.

“It was the golden age of scallops, like the gold rush in California. Prices were sky high. Everybody converted to scalloping because it was so lucrative,” says Sal Del Deo, now a renowned painter who had fished himself for a few summers back then. “The captains recruited anyone who could walk, male or female, to shuck scallops that fall.”

One of the boats that kept going out empty and coming back so laden with scallops that the men on deck could barely see over the piles, was the Patricia Marie, a 50-foot fishing vessel owned by Capt. Billy King. He set out on Oct. 24, 1976, with six crewmembers, going back for yet another load of scallops, just like he had been doing for weeks. But this time the story ended tragically. None of the crew of the Patricia Marie came back alive. It was the worst fishing disaster in Provincetown since 1908.

The facts are known: several boats were heading back to Provincetown, loaded with scallops, trailing each other in a ragged line that stretched out a bit. It was dark, and the boats were only a few miles offshore, running along the north arm of the Outer Cape. It was a fair sea, although the waves were running about 10 feet as the wind had picked up to about 25 knots. Dicey weather, but not enough to worry experienced captains like King.

It was late, so the crews were below-deck sleeping while King was in the pilothouse. He was talking on the radio with another skipper, and because all the captains were on the same channel, they all heard King say he was going to check on something, he’d be right back. He was probably stepping out of the wheelhouse.

The Patricia Marie was on the radar screen of the fishing vessel right in front of it in the string of boats heading home. And the next minute, it was gone, evaporated.

“Billy King was coming back after a trip, loaded to the scuppers. One minute he was there, and then he wasn’t. They never had a chance,” Del Deo said.

The other skippers immediately turned around and headed to the Patricia Marie’s last location. Reports said that one captain heard a man, or perhaps more than one, in the water screaming for help. But it was dark and the water temperature was 50 degrees. The boats steamed back and forth but couldn’t find any survivors. And in a few short minutes, an infinitesimal moment in the generations of men who have fished Provincetown’s waters, a town was brought to its knees.

Just like that, a crew of seven — a father and son, a high school basketball star who was engaged to marry the cheerleader squad captain, a troubled man who was at peace perhaps only on the sea, two regular crew and Billy King — were lost, leaving behind a town that in some ways still hasn’t recovered.

“To lose seven people in one fell swoop knocked everybody on their butt,” said Napi Van Dereck, who was particularly close friends with Richard “Dicky” Oldenquist, a man with a quick temper who had told Van Dereck the trip on Oct. 24 was going to be his last on the Patricia Marie. “Nobody was prepared for so many people to go down.”

The theory of what happened was that a large wave washed over the bow of the boat. Normally, the water would flow off the decks and back into the sea. But the scallops, piled so high on the deck, may have clogged the openings in the rails, pushing the nose down, allowing more water to flood the boat. With the engines now driving the boat towards the bottom of the sea, it would have been submerged in seconds.

There was no mayday call and no time for a life raft. Billy King’s body was found around midday the next day, wearing a life vest. The body of Walter Marshall was dragged up in a fishing net a week later. When the Patricia Marie was finally found, sitting undamaged in 135 feet of water, loaded with scallops, the bodies of the rest of the crew were not there.

“It shook the town to its foundations,” said Chris King, the son of Billy King, who was a sophomore in Provincetown High School at the time of the accident. “Nobody of those generations had seen a disaster like that or had been part of a disaster like that.”

As small towns do in the face of disaster, Provincetown quickly organized memorials to help in a practical way to raise money for the families of the seven crewmembers. But Chris King remembers the emotional aftershocks kept coming, as slowly, eventually, every body except Dicky Oldenquist’s was found.

“People were just getting over it and then they would find another body. That went on for six months,” King said. “But everybody had each other. Everyone was together. No one grieved alone. I’ve never seen anything affect this town like that since. And I’ve lived here my whole life.”

An emotional corner was turned sometime later that fall. King was on the Provincetown High School football team, usually the smallest and worst in the league. In fact, the fall of 1976 was the last year the high school had a football team.

As usual, the Provincetown team was losing, down 14-0 at the half. But then something unusual happened. Three local fishing captains came into the locker room during half-time, something that had never happened before despite the fact the entire fishing community came to the games each week, changing their schedule to fish on Friday — which they usually took off — so they would be free on football Saturdays.

“I remember these guys saying, ‘You don’t know how much this game means to us,’” King said. “All the kids had their heads between their legs. It had been a bad week. But it pushed everybody to do more than they usually do. And we won that game 34-14. It seems like a funny thing to remember, but 30 years later that particular series of events sticks in my mind.

“It seemed like it was the end of the world. But for the young people at least, [that win] made it seem like we could go on. Everybody realized they could go on from here. They came together, they grieved together and they went on together.”

psowers@provincetownbanner.com

picture Captain John King

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: 17 Dec 1796 - Harwich, Massachusetts 21
        Baptism: 
          Death: 23 Feb 1826 - France
         Burial: in Old Burying Ground, Brewster 5
 Cause of Death: 

Events
• Alt Death 22, , France in France


Parents
         Father: Roger King (1765-1804)
         Mother: Jane Gray (1766-1827)

Spouses and Children
1. *Abigail Pepper (9 Aug 1800 -       )
       Marriage: 13 Dec 1819 - Orleans, Massachusetts 23


picture
John King

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: Abt 1707 - (Jamaica)
        Baptism: 
          Death: 26 Apr 1717 - off Billingsgate
         Burial: 
 Cause of Death: 


Notes
General:
Artifacts point to boy's brief life as pirate

By ERIC WILLIAMS
STAFF WRITER
PROVINCETOWN - Young John King wanted to be a pirate. He threatened to kill himself if he was not allowed to join Capt. Sam Bellamy's rogue band of blackguards, and he threatened his mother, too.

King, perhaps 10 years old, got his wish. But he lasted only four months before going down with the pirate ship Whydah off Wellfleet on April 26, 1717. And all that remains of the littlest pirate is a silk sock, a small shoe and a stick-sized leg bone.

That's the science-backed cautionary tale being spun by the Expedition Whydah Sea Lab & Learning Center on MacMillan Pier in Provincetown, where the shoe, sock and bone are on display.

But recent forensic analysis of the bone, removed from the ocean floor approximately 20 years ago, indicates that it came from a boy, perhaps 8 to 11 years old, not a small man as initially thought.

A historical deposition details King's defection during a Bellamy raid in November 1716 off Antigua, and the workmanship of the shoe and sock match his supposed upper-class background. That's led researchers to hypothesize that the artifacts, found closely grouped at the Whydah wreck site, are indeed the earthly remains of a little boy's lousy career choice.

If the science sticks, King would be the youngest pirate ever positively identified, said Whydah center historian Ken Kinkor. ''We feel pretty confident this is the little pirate,'' Kinkor said. ''If it isn't John King, then there was another youngster on board. That was very rare.''

Kinkor has encountered historical evidence of teenage pirates in his research, but he said the average age of pirates during Bellamy's era was approximately 24 years.

When pirates raided another ship, they often acquired men as well as booty, Kinkor said. These defectors, often low-paid sailors, would choose a life of piracy over near-slavery.

But the defection of a young boy, apparently from the upper class, to a life of piracy is perhaps unprecedented in the historical record, Kinkor said.

A deposition detailing King's defection, provided by the commander of the ship on which King was traveling, provides an indication of King's station in life and his age, Kinkor said.

''One John King who was coming as a passenger with him from the said Island of Jamaica to the Island of Antigua deserted his sloop, and went with the pirates and was so far from being forced or compelled thereto by them as the deponent could perceive or learn that he declared he would kill himself if he was restrained, and even threatned (sic) his mother who was then on board as a passenger,'' reads the 1716 deposition of Abijah Savage.

King likely had a chance to sample the pirate's life, Kinkor said, perhaps participating in a dozen or more raids during his months with Bellamy, perhaps acting as a ''powder monkey,'' toting gunpowder to cannons.

(Published: June 6, 2006) Copyright © Cape Cod Times.
picture

Sources


1 Alexis Anderson, Cunninghams of Southwest Nova Scotia (Rootsweb file alex1136), ref Edward Kenwrick: The Ancestor of the Kenricks or Kendricks of Barnstable County and Nova Scotia and His Descendants. 1915. Josiah Paine.

2 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, "Vital records of Eastham and Orleans, Massachusetts" (Mayflower Descendant [several sections]), 33:185. highly incomplete

3 Jay Mack Holbrook, compiler, Records of Eastham and Orleans, Massachusetts 1637-1892, 2002. Oxford MA: Archive Publishing (page images on CD), family records. p 213, Jonathan Kenrick Jr.

4 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, "Vital records of Eastham and Orleans, Massachusetts" (Mayflower Descendant [several sections]), 33:185.

5 Robert Paine Carlson, Cape Cod Gravestones, 2003 ff. Eastham MA. CapeCodGravestones.com.

6 Jay Mack Holbrook, compiler, Records of Eastham and Orleans, Massachusetts 1637-1892, 2002. Oxford MA: Archive Publishing (page images on CD), family records. p 212, Jonathan & Hannah Kenrick.

7 George Ernest Bowman, compiler, "Vital records of Eastham and Orleans, Massachusetts" (Mayflower Descendant [several sections]), 33:86.

8 index to Orleans, Massachusetts cemeteries (1970. Excel file at Orleans Historical Society, http://orleanshistoricalsociety.org/collections.html).

9 Provincetown cemeteries (http://www.provincetowngov.org/historic/cem.htm). badly organized

10 George Ernest Bowman and Ethel A. Richardson, "Provincetown, Massachusetts Vital Records" (Mayflower Descendant), 23:144.

11 Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910 (Massachusetts Archives. [online at AmericanAncestors.org (NEHGS) and FamilySearch.org]), Provincetown, 1897 death record of son Edward.

12 Town records of Wellfleet, Massachusetts (Wellfleet, Massachusetts.), 1:593. Marriages.

13 Provincetown Massachusetts. Town records. (Provincetown Massachusetts), vol. 4.

14 Provincetown cemeteries (http://www.provincetowngov.org/historic/cem.htm).

15 Rosemary West, "R.K. West's Master List" (Sept 2003. Rootsweb).

16 Rootsweb.com, paw123.

17 Town records of Wellfleet, Massachusetts (Wellfleet, Massachusetts.), 1:18. Reuben & Mehitable Newcomb family.

18 New England Historical and Genealogical Register (New England Historic Genealogical Society. Boston), 1959 Vol. 113 p.153.

19 John Bearse Newcomb, Genealogical Memoir of the Newcomb Family (Elgin Illinois, 1874).

20 Bethuel Merritt Newcomb, Andrew Newcomb and His Descendants: A Revised Edition of "Genealogical Memoir" of the Newcomb Family by John Bearse Newcomb (New Haven CT, The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Co., 1923).

21 George Ernest Bowman, editor, Vital Records of the town of Brewster, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 (1904. Boston: Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants [online]), 24.

22 George Ernest Bowman, editor, Vital Records of the town of Brewster, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 (1904. Boston: Mass. Society of Mayflower Descendants [online]), 54.

23 marriages, circa 1761-1844. from Book 2, in "Vital Records of Eastham and Orleans, Massachusetts" (2002. Oxford, MA: Holbrook Research Institute (2 Cds), files H01_04a - H01_04f), 49 (K).


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